Tuesday, 30 September 2014

Procedure For Our Experiment

1Procedure


. Obtain 2 Arduinos, 1 Grove DHT11 sensor, 1 Grove BMP180 sensor, 1 Grove 315MHz RF link kit and 2 Grove shields
2. Connect DHT11 (Humidity and Temperature sensor) to pin A0, BMP180 (Barometer sensor) to pin I2C, 1 Grove 315 MHz receiver to the arduino connecting to the computer via the UART on the shield and 1 Grove 315 MHz transmitter to the arduino being sent up in the balloon via the UART on the shield.
3. Test the connection of the equipment to ensure that the data can be transmitted smoothly.
4. Mount the equipment on the inner surface of the housing.
5. Fill the balloon with helium until the balloon is about 1m in diameter.
6. Tie the balloon to the anchor hoop (Fig 1.1) and ensure that it is resting on top of the housing with minimal gaps (Fig 1.2)
7. Tie a string to the anchor hoop
8. Set the balloon into the air, anchoring it with the string so that it does not fly away and above 60m.
9. Retrieve the information that is pinged onto the computer (Temperature, Humidity and Pressure) (Fig 1.4)
10. Record findings of temperature, humidity and pressure on a graph.
11. After 12 hours (from 6am to 6pm), take the balloon down to prevent the equipment from getting damaged or the balloon from flying away.

ISS Reflections Grp A

What went wrong?

While testing our weather station, we realised that all our equipment was too heavy to take off. This proved to be a huge barrier to get over as we wanted to ensure that our equipment stays safe. Thus, we altered the design a bit and we managed to make it take off soon enough.

Saturday, 20 September 2014

Methods

7. Final Solution

7.1 Procedures: Detail all procedures and experimental design to be used for data collection
1. Obtain 2 Arduinos, 1 Grove DHT11 sensor, 1 Grove BMP180 sensor, 1 Grove 315MHz RF link kit and 2 Grove shields
2. Connect DHT11 (Humidity and Temperature sensor) to pin A0, BMP180 (Barometer sensor) to pin I2C, 1 Grove 315 MHz receiver to the arduino connecting to the computer via the UART on the shield and 1 Grove 315 MHz transmitter to the arduino being sent up in the balloon via the UART on the shield.
3. Test the connection of the equipment to ensure that the data can be transmitted smoothly.
4. Mount the equipment on the inner surface of the housing.
5. Fill the balloon with helium until the balloon is about 1m in diameter.
6. Tie the balloon to the anchor hoop (Fig 1.1) and ensure that it is resting on top of the housing with minimal gaps (Fig 1.2)
7. Tie a string to the anchor hoop
8. Set the balloon into the air, anchoring it with the string so that it does not fly away and above 60m.
9. Retrieve the information that is pinged onto the computer (Temperature, Humidity and Pressure) (Fig 1.4)
10. Record findings of temperature, humidity and pressure on a graph.
11. After 12 hours (from 6am to 6pm), take the balloon down to prevent the equipment from getting damaged or the balloon from flying away.

7.2 Risk and Safety: Identify any potential risks and safety precautions to be taken.

  • We will need to ensure that our balloon does not fly up too high in the sky such that the balloon is lost and interferes with Singapore Air Safety regulations (http://www.caas.gov.sg/caas/en/Regulations/Airspace_Management/Air_Navigation_Hazard_x_Obstruction_Policies/Hot_Air_Balloon_Operations.html).
  • The balloon may burst due to the tension the helium gives.
  • We have never worked with helium before, so we have to be extremely cautious.
    - Inhaling helium can cause oxygen deprivation and too much of this may lead to brain damage
  • It is extremely important to be cautious of the weather (sudden downpour / lightning) as it will be disastrous if lightning strikes our weather balloon and we would get electrocuted in the process.
  • Letting go of the balloon will lead to pollution

Thursday, 31 July 2014

Drop Test Results

Drop Tests Reports


Why do we do the drop tests?

In any case where the balloon pops or the arduino dislodges from the housing, we want to make sure that the arduino does not get damaged and can be used again. Therefore, we do the drop tests to ensure that our arduino can survive a fall and in this case for testing purposes, an egg will emulate the fragility of the arduino and this will save us some money.


Legend: i am a  Dropped from Level 5
      I am a   Dropped from Level 2
        Ia ma  Dropped from Level 3
        Chinese &  Dropped from Level 4



Drop Test 1 (Without Egg):  25 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure spiralled without control.
Damage: No aesthetic damage. Internal Foam bent a little.

Drop Test 2 (With Egg):  29 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure spiralled without control.
Damage: Egg cracked and the yolk spilled everywhere
   Satay Stick also snapped


Drop Test 3 (With Egg): 29 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew downwards in one direction only. The speed of the fall was slow.
Damage: Egg Cracked but did not make a huge mess
   No aesthetic damage.


Drop Test 4 (With Egg): 30 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew downwards with a high speed
Damage: Egg Cracked and the yolk spilled onto the styrofoam parts.  No aesthetic damage


Drop Test 5 (With Egg): 30 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew downwards at a reasonable speed
Damage: Egg Cracked and yolk did not splatter anywhere. However, when we lifted the               structure up, all the yolk spilled out. No Aesthetic Damage


Drop Test 6 (With Egg): 31 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew down at a high speed due to strong winds.
Damage: No damage at all. No aesthetic damage as well.


Drop Test 7 (With Egg): 31 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew down at a reasonable speed.
Damage: Egg Cracked and yolk spilled everywhere. The foam pieces were stained with yolk and thus, we needed to wash the foam pieces with water. The foam pieces became a lot softer than before.


Drop Test 8 (With Egg): 31 July 2014


Free Fall: The structure spiralled without control.
Damage: The egg cracked.


Drop Test 9 (Without Egg): 1 August 2014


Free Fall: The structure spiralled without control.
Damage: No aesthetic damage.


Drop Test 10 (Without Egg): 1 August 2014


Free Fall: The structure flew downwards at a high speed even when a parachute was attached.
Damage: One piece of foam from the base came off.

AND THAT MARKS THE END OF OUR DROP TESTS

Conclusion:


We realised that a parachute is extremely important in our design as it reduces the speed of flight. We also noticed that there were a few successful drop tests when foam was used. The first few tests were using styrofoam.

Saturday, 5 July 2014

Literature Review

Project Title: How does weather affect air pressure?

According to Walter(2005), weather can affect air pressure. The more water you have in the air, the heavier air becomes. So, if there is less water in the air, the air mixture becomes lighter and it will not push down as hard on the barometer. (Walter, 2005)

Friday, 4 July 2014

Literature Review (Bryan Lee)

According to Urbano (2011), the continents on air heat up faster than the oceans, and they cool down faster too. Water has a higher heat capacity than land. So it takes more heat to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree than it does to raise the temperature of land. The heat absorbed by the ocean is spread out over a greater volume because the oceans are transparent (to some degree).The oceans loose a lot of heat from evaporation. In the evaporative loss experiment, While there is some evaporation from wet soils and transpiration by plants, the land does not have anywhere near as much available moisture to cool it down. Urbano(2011)






Cited From: Urbano, L., 2011. The Thermal Difference Between Land and Water, Retrieved July 4th, 2014, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/